The Younger Scene

Check out the Twitter hashtag #StamVegas. There is a reason for that; Stamford is the only town in the state that is growing due to job prospects, places to play and plentiful rentals. Case in point: The kids that grew up here and moved out are now clamoring to come back. Business consultant Yazmin Iglesias grew up in Stamford. The thirty-eight-year-old left once for Hawaii, and another time for Costa Rica, but always returns to her hometown. “It’s so much bigger than when I was growing up. It’s more urban, with trendy restaurants and bars. Plus, there are so many job opportunities, especially in the finance sector,” she says. Zach Leeds also came back after college. “For my age group, there is more stuff to do than when I was growing up,” says the twenty-three-year-old graphic designer. “It seems to draw people from all over, even from
New Haven for some equivalence of
a nightlife.”

This isn’t just happenstance. Stamford’s revival is due to very deliberate planning. The rebuilding of downtown has drawn young professionals from all over with affordable apartments (many of which have pools, game rooms and gyms), which are within walking distance of an exciting bar and restaurant scene with live music. “The economy has improved, so the job situation is better,” says Jeannie Kasindorf, a realtor at The Auslander-Kasindorf Group at Keller-Williams Prestige Properties “The kids want to get out of their parents’ homes and get their own place in a spot with a social life. Stamford is a huge hub.”

Lynne Colatrella, vice president, events and marketing for Stamford Downtown, is part of the team that keeps Stamford from sleeping. She points out just some of the magnets: “We’ve got the Alive@Five concert series, the craft beer festival, outdoor art galleries, Restaurant Weeks, Bark in the Park for dogs, concerts and comedy shows at The Palace, a farmer’s market, great coffee shops, restaurants that cater to a younger crowd. It all adds up to a very appealing place to live.”